Snowmobile trail groomer GODS !


by : Claude Gaboury
Read all articles from Claude Gaboury
Publish on : 2016-03-08
 

What a bold title, but please take it as an « image » only.

Most of snowmobilers have low mileage on their machines this season, mainly due to the incredible effect of El Niño.

Imagine this : on my first ride in early January 2016, in the region of Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean, as I was coming back to Québec, I had to remove piece by piece the snow stuck under my snowmobile tunnel and I was wishing that the molecules of this snow would bring significant snowfall to improve trail conditions in my home area !!!

My phychologist was right… sharing an emotion is healthy and it keeps you sane !!!

Here is another one… more realistic !

Despite the lack of snow in December, January and February, despite drastic changes of temperatures, often above average, despite all kinds of precipitation and all those unfortunate incontrollable weather conditions that affect snowmobiling in many regions of the Province of Québec, our groomer « gods » yet manage to offer trail surfaces in excellent conditions !

Hip Hip Hooray ! Congratulations to groomer operators, you achieve miracles, just like gods…

 

Within the reports on « Clubs Life », we met many of these groomer operators whose main characteristic is their passion !

Many of them are snowmobilers too. Like us, they like to ride on well groomed trails, to take curves bending in the right way, to feel excellent traction on firm trail surfaces and resistant ascents !

Also, these groomer operators-snowmobilers involved in snowmobile clubs, help to put in place safe signage that announces what is coming in front of us !

Can you imagine all the pressure they put up with ?

Some areas being less affected by El Niño, thus with more snow on the ground, all Québec snowmobilers ride there… major traffic.

Imagine the pressure on trails… mostly that useless pressure brought by throttle maniacs, those snowmobile pilots who are convinced that THEIR engine delivers 1 750 HP !!!

« A hole, a bump on a snowmobile trail are the results of brusque accelerations and brakings due to the pilot’s sudden rush of adrenaline ».

It is our behavior, our piloting, not those of hockey fans or petanque fans !

We often see this behavior on trails during weekends near relays and villages where lots of snowmobilers gather.

On week days, we usually meet traveling snowmobilers, more sensitive and respectful of keeping good trail conditions.

Maybe the throttle maniacs will recognize themselves and above all, they will take better control of the 1 750 HP in THEIR engine…

Boys, we all agree… your machine is the most powerful !!!

Never forget that our snowmobiling behavior during the day has consequences on the trail conditions on our way back in the evening !

Groomer operators are unanimous, it is better, safer and more efficient to work during the night. Effectively, as temperatures are colder, the groomed snow hardens more firmly.

Moreover, snowmobilers are sleeping, night is cold and moist, trails are resting, all factors that determine the success of the operation.

Thanks to all groomer operators, thanks for your night hours spent grooming trails, thanks for your skills, thanks for the miracles you achieve.

SledMagazine.com suggests that when you meet a groomer operator, you give him as much space as you can, you wait till he indicates you to move and mostly, even if your face is behind your helmet, smile at him and wave to show your gratitude.

We must never forget that without the beautiful trails in the Province of Québec, without the devotion of thousands of volunteers, all the money invested would be spent in other sectors than snowmobiling.

As the famous song says : « Une chance qu’on s’a »  - We are lucky to have each other. 




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